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the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-year extension makes the most sense. it provides the most certainty for business and financial institutions. it also provides time to prepare for the end of the program in two years. i want to note that this legislation has a cost recovery provision that ensures that no taxpayer is on the hook for this insurance, financial institutions pay for the coverage. this is not and never will be a bailout. this is simply additional insurance paid for by the banks to ensure that these accounts remain stable. lastly, i want to thank lydia -- leader reid for making this issue a priority in the lame-duck session. i also want to thank senator shared brown for being -- share order brown for being a great partner on this important topic. the administration has just issued an s.a.p. in support of the tag and i ask unanimous consent to enter it into the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. joorns mr. johnson: i ask my colleagues to support the extensio
of the lessons klaxon not me start with the fiscal cliff i want to say something like the contract for america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. ronald reagan's supply-side economics, i'm proud of the number of things that made no sense in washington. there is no fiscal clef. this is absolute total nonsense. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to write a great essay by thomas wolfe entitled of the flag catchers. this goes back i think to the 60's when he first wrote this. now, she's trying to describe the particular pattern in san francisco in which the welfare department has figured out all of the senior to the to be on the second floor of the office hiding from the people they served screening the people who are mad and the samoan community in san francisco having figured out the game was and so we have six foot five and 6 feet six summer winds carrying the traditional war close and they would walk up to the front desk and say i want to see the boss and a staff person would say we are not supposed to let you see the boss and they would start to hit the floor. so we wo
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
? can we do it in january? >> guest: well, i would argue that there are two pieces to the fiscal cliff in that you have to do amt this year, and you -- because unless you really intend people to pay that additional tax. it would be very hard in the middle of the tax filing system to reverse that decision. now, you are, i think, correct in the second piece of the fiscal cliff. that is the tax rates that will apply next year. arguably, you don't have to take action this year, you have the whole of next year during which you can reach resolution to that issue. now, the only reason why i think that's an extraordinarily bad idea is i think it would be viewed quite unfavorably by the financial markets. and so you could see a reaction. and it is really bad tax policy to be legislating in the middle of the tax year on the basic structure of the income tax for that year. >> host: we'll go to jeff in tampa, florida, independent caller. >> caller: good morning, how you doing? >> host: good morning, sir. >> caller: yes, i have a question for mr. buckley, and this is more -- it may be a little gene
of congress plus it puts the fiscal cliff and place right now and you lay it out i'm sorry, count me out. stacte want to take the first question? >> you raise a good point. this is where people's eyes glaze over. they can say whatever you want them to say. but the notion, i do think that there's been to the relationship between revenues and the titles and if we want to go bigger the better we need to push all of those, the smaller unit and the less you do on the other side, but there are some who say the idea of the american public is going to buy into this notion okay we are going to look devotees taxes go up so everything can be returned in a tax cut, and we go through this magical power. they are going to think 90% of the approval. so, you're going to have a general consensus. you do this year to get 500 of that in the interest savings alone. this should not be as challenging as it is. >> the other thing i would disagree about is the fact and i have been a huge jet kit and continue to be a huge advocate of tax reform debate and it's a critically important piece and i do think the noti
negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whatever kind of framework, hopefully comes out of the fiscal cliff to their committees to help develop the details of how to do entitlement reform and tax reform. so we are very like you have with us today chairmen bockius who is somebody who's been thinking about these ideas for quite some time, hazard immense amount of expertise and will talk to us today about where the situation stands and where hopefully we will be able to move from there. thank you so much, senator. [applause] >> thank you very much, maya. thank everyone here for fix the debt, putting the fix to get conference together. this is an interesting senate. have my back to all these a luminaries here. i don't know whether there will be darts in my back or spitballs, whatever it's going to be, but it's good to be here and try to help any way i can. i first w
. thank you for the update. >> absolutely. >> in a few minutes, discussion about the fiscal cliff and how it would affect national security. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testified on capitol hill about the government's response hurricane sandy. later, we will re-air the senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. >> and tomorrow morning's "washington journal", peter welch, on the latest development of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterso
the fiscal cliff, because that's important to the country. so i hope we'll have additional chances to communicate with colleagues and the public before we're done. but this is my farewell remarks, observations on 26 years of service here, and it has been an incredible experience. first thing i want to do is say thank you, to you the people of north dakota for having -- thank you to the people of north dakota for having confidence to send me to represent them in the united states national. i was 38 you about but i looke, and people of north dakota elected me in a stunging upset of a long-established incumbent, and i treasure the confidence that they have had in me. i also want to thank my colleagues for the responsibilities that they've given me, the leadership team, senator reid, senator schumer, senator murray, the confidence that they have had in me. and my staff, i have been so blessed to have people who have been with me, in many cases, for more than 20 years. my chiefs of staff, jim margolis, who has been one of the media gurus in the country now doing much of the advertising
to correct the record. but first during this talk about the fiscal cliff and about the tax cuts that sunset at the end of the year, all we've been hearing since the election is about what are we going to do about taxes? that's a very significant thing as a result of the last election because i think it's a foregone conclusion there's going to be more revenue raised. but if we raise the amount of revenue that the president wants raised and raise it from the 2% that he wants to raise it from -- the wealthy -- that's only going to run the government for eight days. so what do you do the other 357 days? or if you look at the deficit, it will only take care of 7% of the $1 trillion-plus deficit that we have every year. what about the other 93%? so the point being that we can talk about taxes and taxes and taxes, but it's not going to solve the fiscal problems facing our nation. we don't have a taxing problem. we have a spending problem. and so we should have been spending the last three weeks talking about how we're going to take care of the other 93% of the problem. the president should have de
for leadership on this issue. 21 days until christmas. 27 days until cliffmas. that's the fiscal cliff, december 31. people are counting down. two-thirds of americans are watching this debate on capitol hill because it affects every single family, every individual. and you think to yourself, could congress possibly step back and let taxes go up on working families? what are we thinking? we know what they're dealing with. many of working families across america struggle paycheck to paycheck. the pew institute did a study last year and asked working families how many could come up with $2,000 in 30 days for an emergency expenditure. it's easy to imagine one. a car repair, a quick trip to the hospital emergency room, $2,000. only half of working families could come up with $2,000 in 30 days. that shows how close to the edge many people live. so now we have before us the possibility that these very same families struggling with these issues are in fact, are in fact going to see their taxes go up december 31. there's one person who will decide that: speaker john boehner, the republican speaker of the
the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vote on the senate-passed legislation. what was once a trickle has become more of a flood. last week republican representative tom cole said it was time to give middle-class families certainty their taxes won't go up by $2,200 on average on january 1. then tim scott from north carolina ad admitted that the senate-passed tax cut will surely pass the house since it will take only 26 republican ren votes for passage. i don't most of the time agree with david brooks but no one can dispute this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on
energy with certainty, both seconds. despite the looming fiscal cliff, americans are focused as we say, on the to do list. what do you consider of a most pressing economic issues facing the united states today, jobs and unemployment far and away number one, 30%. followed by government spending, budget deficit at 15. then back to wages at 11. so 41% saying either wages or unemployment, and then you see the government spending peace. if you look at how this breaks out by republican and democrat, independent, independent and -- they rank jobs higher than wages. if you look at republicans they rank spending as a deficit. when you go back to this idea of compromise what are you compromising about? these are very tricky times in terms of creating a working coalition on that issue. compromise, consider the economic challenges facing the country, which of the following actions do you believe do most of the country improve over the next couple of years? we read three separate approaches to this. number one was growing the economy and creating jobs. even to investments, even if that means contin
, the headline news for the last many weeks has been the fiscal cliff. in speaking with the president six months before the election, a few weeks before the election, a few days before the election and immediately after the election, he indicated that we needed to get our financial house in order and that his goal was to do just that. but to do that, because of past experiences, he laid out what he wanted, and that's very simple. the rates for those who have been blessed with economic security in this country will have to pay a little bit more and those middle-class americans will have the same tax structure they had for the last many years. he will not raise taxes on the middle class and those people who have done well will have to pay a little bit more. the american people think this is the way it should be. now, madam president, just a little bit of history -- i've said this before and i'll go into a little more detail today. when i first became the leader, i took a trip with a number of senators to south america to countries that we american senators had never been to, like bolivia. it was a
committee will be engaged in a hearing on fiscal cliff issues. we'll discuss strategies to create jobs, we'll discuss the implications of the fiscal cliff, and what happens if we don't get some work done by the house to pass the middle-income tax cut. we have to continue to focus on middle-income families, their lives, their struggles and what we can do to ensure they have more dollars in their pocket to continue economic growth. with that, mr. president, i will yield the floor. and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. schumer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, a
through, such as the fiscal cliff, the fact is that there's no way out of the issues without compromise, but i do think we will see compromise on something like immigration reform because demographics is destiny, and the republicans as well as democrats recognize that they have to show support for immigration reform if they are not going to, in the case of the republicans, lose the hispanic population permanently to the republican party, so the president has already, i believe, shown willingness to compromise and all the data shows that republicans are the party that's more further to the right and democrats more to the left, although both parties moved to the extremes. i think we're going to see the president, because he won the election, being tougher rhetorically about not compromises, although saying that he's open to compromise in order to see how far the republicans are willing to move. >> host: so we are taping this interview in the middle of the so-called fiscalically debate. how do you see january 1st -- how would you like to see january 1st come about? >> guest: well, it is cl
-called fiscal cliff by white house economic adviser gene sperling and republican senator rob portman. then we're live with a discussion on the latino vote in the 2012 presidential election and the prospects for changes to immigration policy. and later the senate's back at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches. later, members resume debate on extending the transaction account guarantee or t.a.g. program that provides unlimited deposit insurance cover coverage a procedural vote on that measure is expected along with a vote on president obama's nominee to be the assistant secretary of housing and urban development. live gavel-to-gavel coverage here on c-span2. >> today the pew center ohses a daylong conference on voters' experiences in the 2012 election. representatives from google, facebook, microsoft and twitter as well as democratic and gop secretaries of state will discuss voter registration and id laws and the long lines that occurred outside some voting precincts. live coverage of the conference begins at 9 a.m. eastern over on c-span3. >> now, white house economic adviser gene sperling and
they know is wrong. as you know, they talk about the fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. somebody said it was a bungi jump. somebody said it was a skate board trip, down and then up and so forth. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mistake to have all of this in a pool of ambiguity, and as i understand it now, you would know more. i mean, it truly is a stalemate. they are not talking. >> now, you point out that it's the same player, and, i think, you'll agree player that is matter most are the president, speaker boehner. what do we know about the personal relationship that might illuminate what's going on right now? >> well, they started out last year when they were working on the debt ceiling, and they had what are calledded the merlot and nicorette's meetings. in other words, boehner would have a merlot, and obama would chew nicorette. >> you point outside in the book somehow when they took the official photo, both of those vanished. >> yes. they had iced tea there for obama. of course, boehner had his seg represent, and they put the cigarette in the ashtr
: from our facebook page, chris makes this comment. this fiscal cliff media coverage is absurd. you people are grown adults. get something done. if i could get something done in my job, i would probably be terminated by now. enough already. do something for all americans, not just your party. >> guest: the only criticism i would have with that comment is we're not the ones that are negotiating. there's a limited number of people. i believe if you put me in the room i could get a deal done. but i wouldn't do it -- i would like all republicans up and say what is it we believe in? we willing to give $800 million in terms of income. here's what one for the. here's where we're going to stand. we had to reform medicare to some degree because the real spending is this demographic shift in growth and medicare entitlements. here's what we have to have. most people don't realize the size of token is twice the size was 11 years ago. how many people realize that? that in 11 just the federal government is twice the size in terms of dollars and people? most people don't realize that. so here's th
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
revolution. and tomorrow in the light of congress discussing the so-called fiscal cliff, at 2 p.m. eastern booktv highlights a few programs about economics. james gustav, steve forbes and george gilder all weigh in. watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> now, from albany, new york, we hear about the state-mandated new york state writer's institute. the program promotes cultural initiatives through author presentations, workshops, film screen things and more -- screenings and more. >> i can see each event just as vividly as i can see the posters before me. i'm donald faulkner, i'm director of the new york state writer's institute, and what we do, what i do is kind of herd intellectual cats. we bring a lot of writers through to albany to do readings, we also do a number of other types of programs, events, writing workshops and film series and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we run in saratoga. >> the life of the -- my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everyt
.m. eastern. >> the white house national economic council director discusses the fiscal cliff on monday and emphasizes the administration's position on higher taxes for the wealthy. he spoke at a center for american progress forum titled investing in the future, higher education, innovation and american competitiveness. this is 40 minutes. >> it is my great privilege to introduce gene sperling, director of the white house national economic council and assistant the president for economic policy. gene sperling also is a former senior fellow at the center for american progress, pro-growth progressive. and the connection between innovation, education, ensuring we have an economy that works for everyone. i want to say having served in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the
reduction and avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. after that we're live with a discussion on the ha tee know vote -- latino vote in the 2012 presidential election and the prospects for changes to immigration policy. and later, the senate's back at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches. later in the day members resume debate on a bill to temporarily extend the transaction account guarantee or t.a.d. program that provides limited insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts. a procedural vote on the measure is expected at 5:30 eastern. >> host: well, on "the communicators" we're doing a series looking at the future of tv, and this week we're pleased to have joining us the president and ceo of the national cable and telecommunications association, michael powell. mr. powell, thank you for being on "the communicators" again, we appreciate it. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: if you would, put on your future glasses. >> guest: all right. [laughter] they're on. >> host: look ahead five years, ten years, twenty years. what's tv gonna look like, and especially what's the cable i
. >> on tomorrow morning's washington gorgeous -- washington journal, we continue a look at the fiscal cliff and what happens if those cuts take place in january. after that, charles clark of the government executive media group, looks at the domestic program cuts. and then more about the issue with is bell sawhill
thinks they know is wrong. as you know they talk about the fiscal cliff. some people say if the slope. some say it's a bungee jump. somebody says it is seascape word trip that's going to go down and up and so forth. bottom line i think it's no way to cover. it is a giant mistake to have all of this innate pool of ambiguity. as i understand it now coming due at no more. it truly is a stalemate. they're not talking. >> you point out the same players and the players who matter most are the president, speaker boehner. what do we know about the personal relationship that might eliminate what's going on right now? >> they've started out last year when they were working on the debt ceiling and they had buber called the merlot and nicorette meeting come in other words, boehner would have a merlot and obama which you nicorette. >> you point out in the boat somehow when they took the official photo, both of the spanish. >> yes, they had iced tea for obama. of course boehner had a cigarette and they put the cigarette in the ashtray away from the picture. but they haven't closed the deal on the p
. the debate rahs ling over on the fiscal cliff, if you raised all the dollars and taxes proposed, you only get $31 billion in a year, and they're requesting more than what we'd even get from that. so we need to be good stewards. yes, we want movement, yes, we want it to work right. before we make an investment again, shouldn't we review the business plan? secondly is an issue that mr. denham raised. this was put before the california voters. yes, it looks different today. as a california voter, i personally think you'd have to go back to the california because it's not what was proposed. it said there'd be private funding. there is no proposed private funding as of today. there's no money in, and i question whether it'll be in the future. so does the federal government -- is the federal government now on the hook for the rest of the plan which the voters were asked for and said would come? if we are the biggest funders of this, why would we not -- [inaudible] to what they said they would do? that is a question we all have to do. thirdly, when you read the business plan and you live in my area,
cuts would have on veterans if no agreement is reached on the so-called fiscal cliff. this is 30 minutes. >> thank you, tommy, and, first, let me thank secretary panetta for the up waiverring support to us here at va, but the men and whim who wear and have worn the uniforms of our nation. our close partnership, this meeting that we had today on their plaf has never been more important than it is today. entering the holiday season, i thank the men and women who spend holidays away from our families deafing the nation, we're all great. for the service and sacrifice. as we discussed little of what we do and what originates here, what we work on originates in dod, and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires this close and collaborative working relationship. we have more work to do, but with president obama's strong support and guidance, we applaud the two departments closer together than ever before. we underwritten joint va dod medical facilities where they make sense, harmonizing acquisition decisions, committed both departments to a single common, joint, integrated heal
things done. not limited to just worry about the debt and fiscal cliff and such. our program today just loosely, i'm welcoming you, obviously, joan walker's going the talk, ed reilly of sgi is going the give the polling results, and then ron brownstein of national journal is going to do our interview, and then we're going to have a panel discussion. so it's going to be a full and absolutely terrific day, i think. please, turn these babies off. and, again, welcome you. let me introduce joan walker. joan is executive vice president of allstate which is one of the country's largest insurance, we're in good hands with allstate, we all grew up with that. joan has been a terrific partner, in the last four years she's responsible for all corporate relations with allstate. prior to joining that company in 2005, she did similar work with monsanto and qwest. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist which, of course, in this town of washington is really all about. so, joan, thank you very much, and we want to welcome our friends here. [applause] >> good morning, and thank you so
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
of why we are here, none of you who claim to be here. we are here debating a fiscal cliff. we're here debating direction of america, we were going to go financially. very responsible ability as members of congress. we are the stewards of public funding. it's rightfully have this hearing again and i vitiated. in december when i came, at least a couple issues. we want to invest in infrastructure. one america to move quickly in the best ways possible. what you want from you also need a plan for her. if the networks, a planned test it, it's an audited in a plan that has a review. i happen to come from california. the happiness in the area and many of you talk about. it's part of where it began. i have ruled out of viability, cost and with them and come in this will ever that is why i joined the chairman, mr. denham, mr. miller at the gao, asking for an audit and review of the business plan in california. a look forward to hearing testimony later through corporatists completed. today it has been billions of dollars. as concerns about the business plan itself an equally concerning to me jus
leaders plan to handle social security as part of the fiscal cliff talks. later, more on the role of social security would the aarp and david john of the heritage foundation. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. an official with the department of housing and urban development brief the banking committee of the senate on housing programs that provide rental housing for over 3 million low-income families. she talks about proposals and simplifying operations and reducing cost and hud section eight programs. this is 40 minutes. >> i call this hearing to order. i would like to welcome the honorable senator sandra henriquez about the hud section eight program. millions try to afford everyday a roof over their head. currently, persons with a full-time job and earned about $18.50 per hour in order to afford a modest two-bedroom rental, is the national average. this is an amount far from minimum wage for the income provided by social security income. a further penalty is not just the problem of the largest cities in the country. the hud committee developme
to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, the disastrous i ask unanimous consent sequences of our not acting, tax increases for every american taxpayer, massive cuts to defense at a time when the threats around the world are as varied and as great as we've seen in a long time. other essential programs of the federal government being affected by that. that's the last thing we need in this tepid economy with a lot of people out of work and hoping for some consensus to come together to provide a -- a long-term solution to our fiscal problem that continues to have a negative effect on our economy and more importantly, keeps people out of work. and so as that clock ticks, some are saying, well, partisanship is just too great in washington. the country's too divided. we're not going to be able to reach a consensus here in terms of how to address this problem. i disagree with that. over the last two years, and more, we have had a number of proposals brought forward on a bipartisan basis. it started with simpson-bowles, the former chief of staff to president clinton and al for a lon time, recognized
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate representative of its country's people. turkish journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conve
's desk is the quickest and most sensible way out of this crisis. avoiding the fiscal cliff is no excuse for republicans to replace this artificial crisis with another one. congress should pass the proposal to end periodic standoffs over the debt ceiling. this plan would give president obama the authority to avoid default over the nation's bills. democrats are ready to vote any time but first senator mcconnell needs to stop filibustering his own legislation rhode island now speaker boehner and minority leader mcconnell are the only thing standing between congress and compromise. it's time for them to prove to american families that they're more interested in protecting the medal class than pleasing the tea party. mr. president, on another subject, i rise to honor our colleague, the senior senator from nebraska, ben nelson, upon his retirement from the united states senate, to become effective after the first of the year. for 12 years senator nelson has been a valued member of the democratic caucus and an exemplary senator for nebraska and the country. but his life in public service leads
to conference and pass a defense authorization bill. we have time to debate and avoid the fiscal cliff. we have time to address a farm bill and dozens of others -- other important issues, and we have time to address the transcend ant issue of the universal rights of mankind. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from south dakota. mr. thune: i rise today in strong support of the legislation before us to enact permanent normal trade relations with respect to russia and moldova. this will put in place a new mechanism for combating human rights abuses, commonly known as the magnitsky bill. the economic argument for the legislation before us is clear. russia is the world's sixth largest economy. the world's fifth largest global importer of agricultural products and home to 140 million potential customers, the largest consumer market in europe. russia is already an important and growing market for united states businesses. of the top 15 u.s. trading partners, russia was the market where american companies enjoyed the fastest export growth last year at 38%. if we enact
spending cuts have on veterans if no agreement is reached on the so-called fiscal cliff. this is 30 minutes. >> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for his unwaiverring support, both for those of us in va, and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniforms of the nation. our close partnership, this meeting that we have today, on their behalf, has never been more important than it is today. entering the holiday season, i thank the men and women who spend these holidays away from their families, defending our nation, we're all very grateful for their service and sacrifice. as leon and iƱhr discussed very little of what we do here in va originates here. most of what we work on originates in dod, and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires this close and collaborative working relationship. we have more work to do, but with president obama's strong support and guy dance, we brought the two departments closer together than ever before. we've underwritten joint va-dod medical facilities where they make sense, harmonizing our acquisition decisions, and we've c
was thinking, on this year fiscal cliff, to save money, why can't they put a tab on what these greedy hospitals, doctors, ambulance, lifelike, prescriptions, why can't they put a cap on what they are allowed to charge instead of the agreed bills that they are charging and also, all the money that we're sending overseas, keep the money here in the united states where we needed instead of trying to buy air france. >> host: how much money are responding militarily overseas? >> we have basic architecture of 750 bases scattered around the globe. is that oversees spending, not overseas spending? i still hear, spend it there. i'd like to count that. if you're talking about foreign aid, as it's sometimes called to my f-1 assistance program comes to about 5 percent of our gross domestic product faugh. if i said $26 billion it sounds like a lot of money, but the biggest department of defense appropriations $6,507,000,000,000 is a drop in the bucket. as a proportion of our total federal budget is six -- it is extremely small. so, you know, it is a common misperception in the american public that we spend
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